Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Birdscapes

Not really sure if the word even exists in English vocabulary or not, but it seems to me that many Thai bird photographers are now using it very often. It refers to any photo which shows both the bird and its surrounding environment. Don't really know if there's any specific Japanese word to this kind of bird photography or not, but it seems to be very typical among Japanese photographers. Lately, the trend of "big bird" is slightly becoming less popular among Thai bird photographers and this new trend of small birds with habitat is gaining its popularity. Personally, I'm pretty happy to see this change, partly because I like to see this kind of photos, and I think it also benefits the birds as well because they will be less disturbed. However, I still like to get photos with large birds in the frames whenever I can, but this can be the new alternative which can entertain me no less than the former one.

PS. All photos were taken on last Sunday at the front entrance of my campus. There were several singing male Chestnut-eared Buntings in a small piece of grassland around the area.


5 comments:

Phil said...

Those pictures make you realise how light in weight birds are, perching on virtually nothing. A good looking bunting, nicely captured

Stu said...

Ah you mean shots when we can't get close enough!!!!!

I like these kind of shots too, they look great on A4 prints and bigger.......

Unravel said...

Thanks a lot!
Phil> Yes, I still remember the first time I ringed a bird, I was so scared that I'd make it die, since it's so small and fragile.

Stu> Haha It's a new way of enjoying bird photography when they don't come close enough!

Ryou said...

This style of photography reminds me a lot of Chinese or Japanese paintings. I like the mood which such paintings or pictures like yours manage to capture, especially when the bird is singing. Good shots!

Unravel said...

Ah Yes I think so too, Ryou!
Japanese and Chinese paintings and photographs often have some small birds with lots of other spaces for their habitats.